politics

Why Was the DOJ Using Fake Emails to Communicate?

The Justice Department has handed over 413 pages of documents to the Conservative Watchdog group, Judicial Watch, as part of a Freedom of Information Request. The documents contained emails from one “Elizabeth Carlisle”. This is former AG Loretta Lynch’s alias.

Arguments for their existence include “security concerns and spam to their official email addresses swamping their in-boxes.” This is a poor argument, a very poor argument. Firstly, the spam issue. Anyone who has a regular yahoo email address has a spam filter; it works well enough. Does the US government not have a spam filter that could work slightly better than Yahoo? 

The issue of security concerns is the important one. The DOJ servers are massively protected, they have state f the art tech protecting them from all sorts of viruses and malware. But even so, just because they are using another email account, it doesn’t mean the emails are not on the same server!! Of course they are! So how does using a DOJ email account with a different name, on the same secure server make it any safer? It’s ridiculous.

There is more here than meets the eye. Someone is lying about these email accounts; the arguments just don’t hold water.

 

To be very clear, this is not considered a crime and has in fact been done by others in Government dating back through the Obama years.

Loretta Lynch used the alias “Elizabeth Carlisle” for official emails as attorney general, including those related to her infamous tarmac meeting last summer with former President Clinton.

The emails were included in 413 pages of Justice Department documents provided to conservative watchdog groups Judicial Watch and American Center for Law and Justice.

Top federal officials using email aliases is not illegal or new, considering others in the former Obama administration also used them, arguing security concerns and spam to their official email addresses swamping their in-boxes.

Eric Holder, Lynch’s predecessor, used “Lew Alcindor,” the former name of retired NBA star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

However, critics of the practice argue that such aliases can result in some requested emails to and from officials going undetected.

Lynch used the alias to help craft responses to media requests about the meeting, the documents show.

And former IRS official Lois Lerner, who was at the center of the agency’s targeting of conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status, also used an alias — Toby Miles.

Internet sleuths say Elizabeth Carlisle is the birth name of Lynch’s maternal grandmother. But an actress who has done a number of sultry roles — including “prostitute” and “tipsy” — also has that name.

The Lynch documents were provided to the groups in connection with lawsuits seeking information about the June 27, 2016, meeting on the tarmac of a Phoenix airport.

The meeting came amid an FBI investigation into whether Clinton’s wife, then the Democratic presidential nominee, had revealed classified information when using private email servers while secretary of state.

About a week later, FBI Director James Comey concluded the case by saying Clinton was “extremely careless,” but recommended the Justice Department not pursue criminal charges.

In Senate testimony earlier this year, Comey said the meeting was a “deciding factor” in his decision to act alone to update the public on the investigation.

He also said Lynch had directed him to call the investigation “a matter,” which “confused” him.

The former president left his private plane and boarded Lynch’s uninvited. Lynch said in the aftermath that they talked about grandchildren and other matters, but that the investigation was not discussed.

However, Lynch later said she “regrets” having allowed the meeting.

Lynch’s attorney Robert Raben on Monday told The Daily Caller that Justice Department staffers who process Freedom of Information Act requests are aware of the alias.

He also said the agency acknowledged in February 2016 that Lynch was using the Elizabeth Carlisle alias.

H/T: Fox News

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