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VIDEO: Georgia Doctor Speaks Out After Delta Flight Attendant Barred Passengers From Honoring Fallen Green Beret

After discovering the remains of a fallen Green Beret were aboard her Delta flight a Georgia Doctor and Navy widow asked fellow passengers to join her in singing the National Anthem to honor the soldier. That is, until a flight attendant stepped in, reported WTOC.
When Pamela Gaudry learned that former Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright was being transported on her flight, she went around and asked fellow passengers if they would feel comfortable singing the national anthem in unison, as the Honor Guard unloaded his casket. Several of them thought it was a great idea and agreed. However, prior to landing the chief flight attendant approached Gaudry and told her that it was against company policy.
“I said, ‘it’s the national anthem’ and she said ‘it is against company policy to do that, and so we are going to land and everybody is going to stay in their seats and be quiet.’” -Pamela Gaudry
Gaudry posted a heartfelt video about the experience, upon landing:

“I’m humiliated by my lack of courage to sing the national anthem in my own country on American soil with a deceased soldier on the plane. I just sat there with tears rolling down my face.. I wish I had had more courage to start singing. It’s too late now. I know a lot of people are upset that it didn’t happen and I guess some people are happy.” -Pamela Gaudry
Delta has since reached out to Gaudry. The airline stated that it was not in fact against company policy, and put the fault on the flight attendant. She was also told by company officials that training will be implemented, in response to the incident.
It truly is a sad day when American citizens feel they can’t show pride in their country or honor our fallen. Thank you Dr. Gaudry for bringing national attention to this matter.
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Perseus

Perseus

Former IWI, Defender Of The Flag, Challenger of Titans. Tumblr genders not recognized & victim cards not honored here.




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